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Exploring Roof Builds, Techniques and Tools


About Me

Exploring Roof Builds, Techniques and Tools

Hey everyone, my name is Patricia Brown, but everyone calls me Trish. I will use this site to explore residential roofing materials and building techniques. Roofs protect the home from the elements and provide a stylistic touch unmatched by any other feature. There are a wide range of materials used for roof construction, including copper, asphalt and tile shingles. Even the hardware varies considerably depending on which type of roof you'd like for your home. Every roofer has their own set of tools and techniques used to complete the job. Roofers may utilize high tech tools to measure grades and find leaks. I could go on forever about roofs, so I created this site for my ideas and discoveries about this fun industry. I'd love for you all to follow along with my journey through roof exploration. Welcome!

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Latest Posts

How To Communicate With Homeowners During A Custom Build
28 September 2018

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4 Great Remodeling Ideas For A Home You Want To Use As A Short-Term Rental
3 September 2018

Whether you own a second home or just spend a lot

Why Post Tensioning Is Perfect For Earthquake Areas
24 July 2018

If you live near fault lines and experience earthq

Tips For Installing A Sump Pump In Your Basement To Remove Storm Water
11 June 2018

If your basement is prone to flooding in the winte

Late Autumn Or Early Winter Could Be The Ideal Time To Have Your Deck Installed
25 April 2018

If you're saving money to install a deck in a year

How To Fix Holes In Vinyl Siding

If you notice a hole or puncture in your siding, you don't always have to replace the panel. Vinyl siding is low-cost and typically maintenance free, but a bird, a storm, or stray pebble can cause damage. Ignoring a hole, a crack, or a puncture runs the risk of moisture getting into the house. You should be able to fix the damage yourself by following these steps.

Prepare to Fix the Siding

To repair the hole, gather:

  • Work gloves
  • Rags
  • Sponge
  • Liquid dish detergent
  • Painter's tape
  • Plastic card or similar flat item 
  • Utility knife or razor blade
  • Matching caulk and caulk gun 
  • Siding zip tool (optional)
  • Scrap siding
  • Paintbrush (optional)
  • Acrylic paint (optional)

If possible, wait until the weather warms, so the vinyl gets more pliable. To temporarily fix the hole when you don't have time to fix it immediately, buy a vinyl repair patch kit that comes with clear tape. Before you make any repairs, clean the damaged siding with dish detergent and a damp sponge, rinse, then dry using a clean rag.

Fix a Small Hole or Puncture

Caulk commonly comes in matching colors, but if you can't find a match, buy paintable caulk. You may also be able to get the caulk tinted.

Snip the end of the caulk tube at an angle for better control. Insert the tube into the gun, and press the trigger tow or three times to prime the caulk.

Fill the hole until it spills over the top slightly, removing excess caulk by running a plastic card over it. Alternately, let the caulk dry, and scrape excess with a razor blade or a utility. Paint the caulk to match the siding color if needed.

Fix Tears and Large Holes

To fix tears or large holes, cut a piece of scrap siding several inches bigger than the damaged area with a utility knife or shears. Trim the piece at the uppermost portion, which commonly has nail holes, but avoid cutting the lip edge, then cut the bottom in the same manner.  

If you can't find a piece of scrap siding to match, cut a section of a plastic jug or carton in a matching color. Press the piece over the damaged spot, and caulk it in place. 

To fix a hole or tear more than one inch, you may need a zip tool to detach the piece. Attach the hook of the tool on the lip of the siding, pull it down, then apply foil tape to the back of the hole. Let the caulk dry, reattach the piece, and paint or caulk the hole.